Hey Guerrilla Groupies,

Check out the video and audio for Phonochromaticism here! Thanks to all who attended, and we hope you enjoy.

 

Once again, thanks to Gyre Music (www.gyremusic.com) for sponsoring this event and making sure it happened without a hitch!

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Hey Guerrilla Groupies,

We’ll let Mr. Dunn take it from here:

Anyone who thinks classical music is going the way of the telephone booth needs to be kidnapped by the Guerrilla Composers Guild (GCG) and taken to the Center for New Music holding pen… dozens of new-music lovers crammed into the concert space to hear the evolving group Phonochrome and friends play six new chamber works by as many worthy composers. Almost everyone — performers, composers, and, most significantly, audience members — was apparently under 30. I can now die in peace knowing art music will continue to prosper… Speaking in Early Telephone Booth lingo, my Hat Is Off to all concerned with this Guerrilla enterprise.

- Jeff Dunn on GCG and Phonochrome, San Francisco Classical Voicehttps://www.sfcv.org/reviews/guerrilla-guilds-light-programming

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Finally, thanks again to Gyre Music for sponsoring this show! It helps to have support form organizations that want to see us succeed and do what they can to ensure we do. Thanks from the bottom of our hearts!
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Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show. Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Who are you? Where did you get your start?

My name is Nathan Campbell. I’m originally from Washington State, but I’ve spent the past several years living in California. I started piano at an early age and I was soon composing.

NathanYou seem to be high in demand as of late, why this ensemble?

I really enjoy writing chamber music and I’m particularly fond of the many variations of the piano trio, which is what drove me to pursue working on this project with Phonochrome.

What can listeners expect?

While my music does have minimalist tendencies, I like to think of it more as an exploration of time and playing with our perception of proportion. I enjoy getting lost and finding the beauty in the patience that is required to be lost.

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show.

Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


ensemble_project_headshots-02

Who are you? What do you do?

Matthias: My name is Matthias McIntire – I’m a composer, violinist, violist, and teacher, originally from Toronto, Canada.

Liz: I started flute at the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music after two years of asking my parents for a violin. They didn’t want to listen to me scratching away but I kept asking, so they compromised by getting me a flute. I fell in love with it right away.

What about music makes you want to collaborate?

Liz: I was lucky to grow up in New York City, where I learned about music by attending the Young People’s Concerts with the New York Philharmonic and seeing Wynton Marsalis’ Jazz for Young People. I remember being struck by how many personalities the orchestra could have and more generally, music’s ability to bring many different people together. That’s something I find really motivating and strive to achieve in my projects now. If someone tells me that they related to or were touched by something I did, I feel like I’ve succeeded.

Why did you want to do this crazy project with us?

Liz: I’ve always thought the work of the Guerrilla Composers was interesting, and Nick approached me about doing something pretty soon after Phonochrome got off the ground last fall. I love playing contemporary music, so this project was an exciting way for us to commission and play new music while embarking on a project that explores our identity as an ensemble with diverse interests.10151758_651695134908768_5569294298535189251_n

 

What did you write about… did any color jump out at you?

Matthias: My piece “Mackenzie Caverns” explores shades of the color violet as inspired by the image of a cavern; bright violet crystal structures sprouting from the deep, and the disquiet that might arise in the darker places.

How has the whole workshop process gone for you?

Matthias: This project with Phonochrome and the Guerrilla Composers Guild has not only been an exciting opportunity to workshop my music as a young composer, but also a platform for me to explore sounds and ideas inspired by color and the natural world.

http://www.matthiasmcintire.com/

www.phonochrome.org

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show. Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Who are you, how did you get here?

At the age of 21, I didn’t play an instrument, I couldn’t read music, and I had no exceptional exposure to “classical” concert music. When I started to take class piano lessons as an elective that year, it became clear that music was what I wanted to pursue in life.

With such great players at your disposal, what did you decide to do?

The piece I wrote for Phonochrome (Infrared) can best be described as 7 minutes of whiplash inducing polystylism. Within a span of 12 measures the players are asked to switch mood markers from ‘suddenly somber’ to ‘violent, harsh’ to ‘whimsical’ back to ‘somber’. unnamed-1

What was your color?

Infrared lies at one extreme of the spectrum, where visible light becomes invisible. I wanted to explore the transition from structure and logic (the seen), to mystery and intuition (invisible).

How has it been working with us and Phonochrome? Good, I hope?

Workshopping this piece with Phonochrome was very useful. The first minute of this piece is quite challenging, with rapidly changing rhythmic stress patterns at a fast tempo. In about 3 passes, Phonochrome had this section nearly up to tempo. It was clear at that point that I could be as imaginative as I wanted with this stellar group.

 

In addition to Phonochrome, Mark will be participating in the Oregon Bach Festival this summer, be sure to check his stuff out online!

www.markackerley.com

 

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show.

Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Who are you? Where did you get your start?

Benjamin: I grew up in Boston and later went to Bard College Conservatory, which is where I connected with Allegra. I studied composition with Joan Tower and George Tsontakis, and also did a degree in philosophy.

Allegra: I began playing piano at the age of six. My parents got our family an upright on a whim and I refused to stop smashing the keys, so they decided to give me lessons. I fell in love with it right away and, though I had some flirtations in college with non-profit work, I haven’t stopped since. I did most of my studies in New York, at Bard College Conservatory and at Juilliard, and then came back home to the Bay Area to do a one year post-grad degree at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. I’m so happy to be back in the Bay Area and working with wonderful people!

droppedImageIf you had to describe your writing style to a would be listener, how would you do it?

Benjamin: I write expressive music with an inner conflict. I think great music needs a convincing emotional argument at its core (usually deriving from the big structure), and also some sort of beauty in the surface detail.

Why did you want to be a part of this GCG project?

Benjamin: Allegra is an old friend and I trust inpretty much anything she’s involved with. We’ve worked together before, but I think this is the fist time I’ve written something specifically for her – so it was a good opportunity. It’s also nice to get out of Boston and be heard in a different city.

Allegra: I’m part of Phonochrome and this is our second large-scale project together. We’ve been wanting to do a commissioning project since we started and were excited to work with GCG on this. The project is a kind of playful exploration on our name and a way for us to work with fabulous composers. We’re also thrilled to be playing with our two wonderful guest artists – Anne Rainwater and Pei-Ling Lin.

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What color did you choose? What does it mean?

Benjamin: I chose green. It’s stuck between the warm and cool colors. It’s associated with nature and environmentalism on the one hand, and with money, jealousy, and envy on the other. There’s a complexity to these evocations – a contradiction to capture in music

What events do you have coming up you’d like folks to know about?

Benjamin: After this concert, I head up to the Vancouver International Song Institute for their Art Song Lab. I also have a new piano sonata being premiered internationally by Thomas Hecht this summer. And I’ll be back in San Francisco at the next opportunity!

www.benjaminpesetsky.com

www.allegrachapman.com

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show.

Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Name and trade? What do you do, how did you get here?

Alex: My name is Alex Christie and I am a composer, improviser, and educator working the realms of acoustic music and electronic music. I like to experiment with the unusual sounds acoustic instruments can make. I tend to compose acoustic music that is influenced by electronic sound and electronic music that is influenced by acoustic sound. I like noise and I like working with the extremes of musical parameters.

Anne: My name is Anne Rainwater and I began playing piano at the age of three and became interested in contemporary music in high school. At Oberlin and Manhattan School of Music. After living in New York for a few years after graduate school, I decided to move back to the Bay Area where I grew up and pursue my career here. I’m so happy to be here in the Bay Area creating and exploring new music!

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How did you figure composing music was for you?

Alex: I am driven to write music because I can’t really do anything else. It just kind of happened, but it feels natural and necessary to me. I think that sound is expressive and stimulating in a bunch of different ways. The music I make allows me to find beautiful and interesting things in sound worlds that traditionally may be considered “ugly”.

Why did you want to be a part of the Guerrilla Composers Guild and Phonochromaticism?

Alex: I know some people who are/have been involved with GCG and I have lots of respect for them. GCG is an organization that has the right idea: let’s help people make new music.

Anne: After living in New York for a few years after graduate school, I decided to move back to the Bay Area where I grew up and pursue my career here. It’s been such a pleasure working with the composers and other performers on this project – how great to have a whole recital of premieres!

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What’s your color?

Alex: I chose indigo as my color for this project initially because it matches this really cool mushroom that bleeds green (but has indigo skin). Once I actually started working on the piece, however, the mushroom idea faded to the background, but it’s still a cool color. There also seems to be an odd history around indigo and whether or not it actually exists.

Final thoughts? What else are you up to?

Alex: Phonochrome has been wonderful. It’s a great feeling as a composer to have skilled performers approach your work with so much enthusiasm.

Anne: Currently, I’m teaching a chamber music class at Marin Academy High School, private piano lessons in Marin and San Francisco, and gigging around with friends. Recently, I’ve worked with members of the Aleron Trio, Nonsemble 6, and Phonochrome, and I have a piano-percussion duo called futureCities with my friend Jude Traxler.

www.alexchristie.org

www.annerainwater.com

 

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This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

nick poster

Dear everybody,

This is it. I’m almost done with graduate school, and this concert is going to help me go out with a bang.

I wanted to invite you to my graduate composition recital on the evening of Thursday, May 15, at 8pm in the Recital Hall at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. It is proving to be a formidable program! There will be chamber music, art songs, and a chamber orchestra as the primary event. There will even be a choir, directed by yours truly!

Three pieces were the direct result of GCG Projects, which makes this recital pretty special if you’re still learning about what we’ve done in the past. Let me tell you, it’s varied…

Performers and pieces include: the International Low Brass Trio, Jarring Sounds, The Bog Bodies, Chelsea Hollow and Sophie Xuefei Zhang, and then finally Danielle Reuter-Harrah and Tyler Catlin leading a chamber orchestra featuring my Dickinson song cycle. Then, to finish off the night, will be my choral piece and of course a wonderful reception.

Read the preview in the examiner here: http://www.examiner.com/article/two-composition-recitals-at-sfcm-will-be-worth-considering

Here is the facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/287266674773423/288142078019216

I’m looking forward to seeing you all there! Coming up next will be posts about Phonochrome

Nick

For those of you that missed it, here you go… Jarring Sounds performing pieces written for them last Thursday, April 24!

Enjoy!

Hey Guerrilla Groupies,

Check out photos from our show with Jarring Sounds at the Center for New Music. They are probably easiest to navigate on facebook…