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Thanks to the Examiner.com and Stephen Smoliar for writing about our two upcoming shows and our project announcement!

First, in December, be sure to catch Teleformation at the Center for New Music and TAC: Temescal Art Center (Dec 3 and 12). More on that soon…

Second, a HUGE announcement (second half of the article): We are so excited to get to work with Nick Bacchetto, Kyle Randall, Dan VanHassel, and Chace Wall and Ignition Duo in February!

They will be joining Julie Barwick, Nick Benavides, Danny Clay, and Anthony Porter. We’ll keep you updated as workshops begin.

Thanks to all who applied, the applications were our strongest yet, and we hope to see you at the show!

http://www.examiner.com/article/the-guerrilla-composers-guild-announces-two-collaborative-concerts-at-c4nm

Dear Guerrilla Groupies, a concert date change:

Due to unforeseen and significant circumstances, we are changing the dates for our Teleformation concerts from Oct 30 and Nov 1 to Dec 3 and 12. We understand a few of you had this in your calendars, and appreciate your understanding. We can’t wait to see you there! See below for more information.

The Guerrilla Composers Guild presents Teleformation: the symbiosis of early and new musical styles and ideas. Following a long tradition of transforming baroque ideas by pioneers like Mozart and Halvorsen, the Guerrillas are putting their own spin on reimagining baroque forms and styles. The composers are collaborating with dynamic Bay Area performers Vijay Chalasani (viola), Crystal Pascucci (cello), and Chris Whitley (violin), to produce a show that intertwines the forms of the vintage masters with the styles of rising local talent. The pieces range from solo viola to string trio, and audience members will be treated to the perfect pairing of early and new in an intimate and relaxed setting.

Teleformation concert details:

December 3rd, 7:30PM
The Center for New Music
55 Taylor St.
San Francisco, CA 94102

December 12th, 7:30PM
Temescal Arts Center
511 48th St.
Oakland, CA 94609

groupshot-GCG-dannysmallside

 

(Danny was there for the photo, we swear.)

teleformation - poster (smallest)

The Guerrilla Composers Guild presents Teleformation: the symbiosis of early and new musical styles and ideas. Following a long tradition of transforming baroque ideas by pioneers like Mozart and Halvorsen, the Guerrillas are putting their own spin on reimagining baroque forms and styles. The composers are collaborating with dynamic Bay Area performers Vijay Chalasani (viola), Crystal Pascucci (cello), and Chris Whitley (violin), to produce a show that intertwines the forms of the vintage masters with the styles of rising local talent. The pieces range from solo viola to string trio, and audience members will be treated to the perfect pairing of early and new in an intimate and relaxed setting.

 

October 30 at the Center for New Music in San Francisco:
https://www.facebook.com/events/952366578112701/

November 1, 2014 at the Temescal Arts Center in Oakland:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1513416715565386/
Works by: Benavides, Biber, Clay, Colombo, Halvorsen, Mozart, and Withrow Beer and refreshments served, mingling encouraged.

 

 

Hey all,

Many of you know how much we love the International Low Brass Trio. They’ve worked their butts off this year to learn, premiere, and now record a bunch of new pieces and were one of the bigger Guerrilla Composers Guild collaborators. We are fortunate to have many of our pieces on the EP! Nick Benavides did the recording and editing, and Zach Miley did the mixing and mastering, and we think it came out beautifully. It’s also, might we add, super cheap, so pick up a copy!

Hey Guerrilla Groupies,

Check out the video and audio for Phonochromaticism here! Thanks to all who attended, and we hope you enjoy.

 

Once again, thanks to Gyre Music (www.gyremusic.com) for sponsoring this event and making sure it happened without a hitch!

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Hey Guerrilla Groupies,

We’ll let Mr. Dunn take it from here:

Anyone who thinks classical music is going the way of the telephone booth needs to be kidnapped by the Guerrilla Composers Guild (GCG) and taken to the Center for New Music holding pen… dozens of new-music lovers crammed into the concert space to hear the evolving group Phonochrome and friends play six new chamber works by as many worthy composers. Almost everyone — performers, composers, and, most significantly, audience members — was apparently under 30. I can now die in peace knowing art music will continue to prosper… Speaking in Early Telephone Booth lingo, my Hat Is Off to all concerned with this Guerrilla enterprise.

– Jeff Dunn on GCG and Phonochrome, San Francisco Classical Voicehttps://www.sfcv.org/reviews/guerrilla-guilds-light-programming

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Finally, thanks again to Gyre Music for sponsoring this show! It helps to have support form organizations that want to see us succeed and do what they can to ensure we do. Thanks from the bottom of our hearts!
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Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show. Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Who are you? Where did you get your start?

My name is Nathan Campbell. I’m originally from Washington State, but I’ve spent the past several years living in California. I started piano at an early age and I was soon composing.

NathanYou seem to be high in demand as of late, why this ensemble?

I really enjoy writing chamber music and I’m particularly fond of the many variations of the piano trio, which is what drove me to pursue working on this project with Phonochrome.

What can listeners expect?

While my music does have minimalist tendencies, I like to think of it more as an exploration of time and playing with our perception of proportion. I enjoy getting lost and finding the beauty in the patience that is required to be lost.

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show.

Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


ensemble_project_headshots-02

Who are you? What do you do?

Matthias: My name is Matthias McIntire – I’m a composer, violinist, violist, and teacher, originally from Toronto, Canada.

Liz: I started flute at the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music after two years of asking my parents for a violin. They didn’t want to listen to me scratching away but I kept asking, so they compromised by getting me a flute. I fell in love with it right away.

What about music makes you want to collaborate?

Liz: I was lucky to grow up in New York City, where I learned about music by attending the Young People’s Concerts with the New York Philharmonic and seeing Wynton Marsalis’ Jazz for Young People. I remember being struck by how many personalities the orchestra could have and more generally, music’s ability to bring many different people together. That’s something I find really motivating and strive to achieve in my projects now. If someone tells me that they related to or were touched by something I did, I feel like I’ve succeeded.

Why did you want to do this crazy project with us?

Liz: I’ve always thought the work of the Guerrilla Composers was interesting, and Nick approached me about doing something pretty soon after Phonochrome got off the ground last fall. I love playing contemporary music, so this project was an exciting way for us to commission and play new music while embarking on a project that explores our identity as an ensemble with diverse interests.10151758_651695134908768_5569294298535189251_n

 

What did you write about… did any color jump out at you?

Matthias: My piece “Mackenzie Caverns” explores shades of the color violet as inspired by the image of a cavern; bright violet crystal structures sprouting from the deep, and the disquiet that might arise in the darker places.

How has the whole workshop process gone for you?

Matthias: This project with Phonochrome and the Guerrilla Composers Guild has not only been an exciting opportunity to workshop my music as a young composer, but also a platform for me to explore sounds and ideas inspired by color and the natural world.

http://www.matthiasmcintire.com/

www.phonochrome.org

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print

Leading up to the Phonochromaticism concert on May 29th at the Center for New Music we will be talking to our composers and performers to get an idea of how their brains work and releasing one or two per day leading up to the show. Per usual, the composers will initially be anonymous, but you are welcome to read this (spoilers!) and give yourself a competitive advantage in guessing before the official announcement!


Who are you, how did you get here?

At the age of 21, I didn’t play an instrument, I couldn’t read music, and I had no exceptional exposure to “classical” concert music. When I started to take class piano lessons as an elective that year, it became clear that music was what I wanted to pursue in life.

With such great players at your disposal, what did you decide to do?

The piece I wrote for Phonochrome (Infrared) can best be described as 7 minutes of whiplash inducing polystylism. Within a span of 12 measures the players are asked to switch mood markers from ‘suddenly somber’ to ‘violent, harsh’ to ‘whimsical’ back to ‘somber’. unnamed-1

What was your color?

Infrared lies at one extreme of the spectrum, where visible light becomes invisible. I wanted to explore the transition from structure and logic (the seen), to mystery and intuition (invisible).

How has it been working with us and Phonochrome? Good, I hope?

Workshopping this piece with Phonochrome was very useful. The first minute of this piece is quite challenging, with rapidly changing rhythmic stress patterns at a fast tempo. In about 3 passes, Phonochrome had this section nearly up to tempo. It was clear at that point that I could be as imaginative as I wanted with this stellar group.

 

In addition to Phonochrome, Mark will be participating in the Oregon Bach Festival this summer, be sure to check his stuff out online!

www.markackerley.com

 

This concert is generously sponsored by Gyre Music:
Gyre Music was founded in 2000 to promote the compositions of Frank Wallace, which are called “contemporary musical emancipation” by NewMusicBox.org. Gyre has published over 100 songs as well as dozens of solos and chamber works for guitar with flute, clarinet, mandolin, violin, English horn, cello, viola and piano. Scores are available as PDF downloads or fine Printed Editions with art work and design by Nancy Knowles. Many recordings of Wallace’s works are also produced by Gyre and are consistently praised for their sonic beauty. Gyre Music is at www.gyremusic.com.

logo_gyre_print